Making of the Modern World

Eleanor Roosevelt College


Email: ercmmw@ucsd.edu

Website: http://roosevelt.ucsd.edu/mmw/index.html

Staff Contact: ercmmw@ucsd.edu, (858) 534-4935


The core of the Eleanor Roosevelt College (ERC) general education requirements is the Making of the Modern World Program (MMW) which, like the college, was founded in 1988. MMW is the academic expression of the official mission of ERC which seeks, in part, “to feature dimensions of international understanding and cultural diversity.” MMW is an interdisciplinary, multi-course sequence which provides a broad, global overview of the past from the dawn of human history (MMW 11) to the achievements and challenges of the contemporary world (MMW 15). Writing instruction, equally important to the program’s general education mission, is imbedded in the course work.

Students entering ERC as freshmen complete a five-course sequence, numbered MMW 11 to MMW 15. Students entering ERC as transfers complete a two-course sequence, numbered MMW 21 and MMW22.

Classes meet for three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week, except for the writing-intensive six-credit MMW 12 and MMW 13 courses which meet for three hours of lecture and two meetings of discussion section (for two hours total) per week. The remaining MMW courses (MMW 11, 14, 15, 21, and 22) are four credit courses.

MMW Overview

MMW 11: Pre-History and Ancient Foundations. Offered in Fall. 4 credits

MMW 12: Classical and Medieval Traditions (100BCE-1200CE). Offered in Winter. 6 credits.

MMW 13: New Ideas and Cultural Encounters (1200-1750). Offered Spring. 6 credits.

MMW 14: Revolution, Industry, Empire (1750-1917). Offered in Fall and Winter. 4 Credits.

MMW 15: Twentieth Century and Beyond. Offered in Spring. 4 Credits.

MMW 21: Exploring the Pre-Modern World. Offered in Fall. 4 credits. Transfers only.

MMW 22: Exploring the Modern World. Offered in Winter. 4 credits. Transfers only.

MMW 12-15 and MMW 21-22 are offered on campus during Summer Session.

MMW 14 and MMW 15 are also offered in the summer as part of the Global Seminars, a 5-week study abroad experience.

MMW 11: Pre-History and Ancient Foundations (4) MMW 11 begins with an exploration of human origins, the emergence of social organization, and the strategies early societies used to negotiate their physical and social environments. The course continues through to the development of the ancient world’s classical traditions in China, India, Mesopotamia, and Greece. This course is delivered through three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion section each week.

MMW 12: Classical and Medieval Traditions (6) Covering the period from 100 BCE to 1200 CE, MMW 12 examines classical empires (Han China, Roman Empire, Gupta India, etc.) from the period of their greatest achievements to their collapse and transformation into distinct medieval forms. MMW 12 also explores the rise and spread of three religious movements that have significantly influenced the global past (and continue to impact the present): Christianity, Islam, and Mahayana Buddhism. MMW 12 is the first of two writing-intensive quarters in the MMW sequence and is delivered through three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion section each week.

MMW 13: New Ideas and Cultural Encounters (6) MMW 13 covers the transition from the medieval to the early modern world and provides a framework for understanding developments in the global past from the thirteenth to the eighteenth century. This period witnessed increased interaction between cultures and continents through trade, exploration, conquest, and missionary activity and experienced dynamic change in political, philosophical, and religious thought as well as scientific understanding. This course is the second of two writing-intensive quarters in the MMW sequence and is delivered through three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion section each week.

MMW 14: Revolution, Industry, and Empire (4) This course introduces the “modern age” of the nineteenth century, an era characterized by revolutions, industrialization, imperialism, independence movements, and global reform programs. Beginning with the European Enlightenment and Atlantic revolutions of the eighteenth century and early nineteenth century, the course examines the global impact of and responses to westernization. The course is delivered through three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion section each week.

MMW 15: Twentieth Century and Beyond (4) This course begins with the causes and consequences of World War I and the post-war crisis of liberal values and institutions. It goes on to examine the deepening crisis of the 1930s, especially evident in the emergence of ideological politics and extreme nationalism in the context of worldwide depression, an examination that provides the background for understanding World War II. In the post-war period, attention is given to the Cold War, the competition between capitalism and communism, and the process of decolonization. The course ends with the collapse of communism and the emergence of a new world order (or disorder) and its challenges. The course is delivered through three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion section each week.

MMW 21: Exploring the Pre-modern World (Transfer Students Only) (4) MMW 21, the first of two required courses for ERC transfer students, addresses specific themes and topics from the pre-modern world (antiquity to the eighteenth century) and strengthens
transfer students’ research and writing skills. The course is delivered through three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion section each week.

MMW 22: Exploring the Modern World (Transfer Students Only) (4) MMW 22, the second of two required courses for ERC transfer students, addresses specific themes and topics from the modern world (eighteenth century to the present) and strengthens transfer students’ research and writing skills.

Teaching Assistants: TAs new to MMW teach in the first-year of the sequence (MMW 11-MMW 13). During the fall quarter, in lieu of teaching, most new TAs attend a training seminar (MMW 200). In this seminar, TAs are given a preview of the content of the program, practice teaching, design lesson plans, and discuss readings in pedagogy and composition theory. MMW 11 TAs attend three hours of lecture per week and meet with two sections of 31 students each once weekly. In MMW 12 and MMW 13, TAs attend three hours of lecture per week and meet with two sections of 15 students each twice weekly. In all three quarters, TAs proctor and grade exams, and are responsible for planning and implementing section activities that allow students to explore the lecture material in depth and to improve their critical reading skills. In MMW 12 and MMW 13, TAs also teach writing (following the instruction provided by the program) and grade all assignments and exams.

In the second year of the program (MMW 14 – MMW 15) and in the transfer sequence (MMW 21 and MMW 22), TAs attend three hours of lecture per week and meet with two sections of approximately 31 students each once weekly. As in the first year, TAs grade all assignments and exams.

All TAs are required to hold two office hours weekly, attend hour-long program meetings (weekly in the first year, bi-weekly in the second year), and meet regularly with the course professors. New TAs must attend a two-day orientation in the fall; all TAs attend short orientations prior to the beginning of Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters.

We hope to match the cross-disciplinary strengths of the faculty with a diverse group of teaching assistants. While we don’t expect that TAs will have an academic background in the course material, we prefer that they bring to the program a zest for inter-disciplinary dialogue, the experience of living or traveling abroad, and an academic background that reflects an international perspective. We expect our TAs to have a lively interest in students, the ability to write well and, above all, a demonstrated commitment to teaching.